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Creative

  • Workshops are led by a writer-teacher and are conducted on a strict rota with two/three samples of work considered every week, each student work-shopped three times in a term.  
  • Tutorials: For the duration of the programme, every student is assigned to one of several experienced writer-tutors with whom regular meetings are scheduled The tutor provides a constant source of support and advice to guide you through all elements and skills taught in the programme. 
  • Every year we invite authors to be visiting speakers on this programme and we endeavor to represent a variety of modes and approaches. Where we have the speaker's permission, we will upload audio recordings.  However, you are also more than welcome to attend. 

Creative assessment:

Assessment is via a portfolio of work developed from your workshop work. Normally this will be no more than 25,000 words of prose, 600 lines of poetry, or the equivalent in other genres or forms (as agreed with your tutor). The portfolio represents a space in which you showcase your best work.

Craft and Experimentation

  • Reading as a Writer (CX1):  this is taught with weekly lectures and discussions (2 hours total) on elements of craft, reading like a writer, and experimentation in your creative practice: the purpose being to reach a shared creative vocabulary and knowledge (in part, for workshop discussions) and to explore precedents and techniques for creating character, point of view, place, time and structure, and to consider related themes to give depth to your own writing and critical skills.
  • Experimentation (CX2): Taught in semester two, weekly seminars (2 hours total) continuing the close reading practice of the first semester and exploring experimentation in form.

Assessment is by a portfolio of creative work as per guidelines given at the start of the year.

Editing and Publication

  • Copyright, Publishing and the Culture of Reception: weekly discussions and seminars that consider the legal, material, mechanical and wider cultural (media) contexts for creative work and the issues that arise from them. Book reviewing, the literary magazine, the role of the agent, the publishing contract, models of publishing including PoD and the Web, will be considered.
  • Editing the Twenty-First Century: Editorial Project: This is a supervised creative or research project, either individual or collaborative, in which you select an activity particularly relevant to your creative work and produces a project in relation to it. The projects are bespoke, undertaken with the agreement of the course convenor, and can consist of: editorial work on the Course web-zine, the creation of a new web magazine or a creative site; the creation of a paper magazine or chap-book; an adaptation from one medium to another (e.g. dramatisation for radio or screen); development of Resource Centre, creation and/or maintenance of Moodle resources, outreach activities, etc.
EOD; $contentSummary = <<Classes are taught via video conferencing and an online virtual learning platform called Moodle, where you can participate in forums, download class notes, watch related video, and submit written work for feedback. Workshops and seminars are at set times during the semester; however, these are recorded so you can watch in your own time if you can’t make the class.

You are also always welcome to take part in our campus-based classes and events, if you are able.

You will also have one-on-one tutorials at a time agreed between you and your tutor throughout the semester for extra support with your work.

Our outgoing students have found the mixture of workshops and seminars via video conferencing and virtual learning environments to work really well in shaping their creative practice and developing their writing.  

EOD; $contentSummary = <<"One of the wisest moves of my professional career was doing the Mlitt in Creative Writing at Glasgow University. I worked with the finest of tutors and with their generous support and creative insights I actually discovered what it was I wanted to write. I feel I got to know my novel at Glasgow University and one year on I know exactly where I am going with it". Lisa O’Donnell (2015)

"The Creative Writing Programme introduced me to a community of writers, in person and from a distance, who I hope to communicate with for life. It taught me the value of maintaining a writing structure around my already busy life. I learned to find inspiration everywhere but also discovered how the tools in my toolbox could translate that inspiration into something on the page. It gave me the confidence and perhaps even the permission to describe myself to others as 'a writer." Joanne Young (2015)

"After years of self-doubt and internal debate, I signed up for the MLitt Distance Learning programme while living in Japan. While the volume of work was challenging, I can honestly say that the programme was the best thing that has ever happened for my writing. Weekly video workshops with my cohort and tutors provided me with a wonderful sounding board and space for experimentation, and the frequency of assignments got me into the habit of writing regularly. The course also helped to develop skills in terms of "reading like an author" and provided exposure to the world of publishing from the perspective of publishers, literary agents and published alumni. Overall I feel like the course has allowed me to be more confident and polished in my writing, but most valuably has provided me with the skills to continue to analyse myself and my work." Nichola Deadman

"I wanted to study for a distance creative writing Masters so I could work around my family and freelance work, and this course allowed me to do that - with the benefit of being able to go to Glasgow for a tutorial when I had a couple of free days. I began the course with an idea of the kind of writer I was and expected my studies to confirm it, but I've been surprised at how my writing has changed. I'm leaving at the end of the year with two big projects to carry on with, neither of which would have developed in the way they have without the direction of the course and teaching staff." Sarah Palmer (2015)

EOD; $contentSummary = <<Creative

Workshops

Workshops are led by a writer teacher and are conducted on a strict rota with two/three samples of work considered every week, and each student work-shopped twice per semester.  Students and workshop leaders analyse that week's samples providing corrections, suggestions, queries and commentary, relating to diction, pace, tone, point of view, structure, form etc.

Tutorials

For the duration of the programme, every student is assigned to one of several experienced writer-tutors with whom regular meetings are scheduled and who will help bring together the workshop and seminar elements in relation to your writing and development.

Visiting speakers

Visiting speakers in the Creative area of the MLitt will invariably be writers, and we will endeavour to represent a variety of modes and approaches. These events are often open to the School and College at large and public attendance is encouraged. Not all events will necessarily take place at the University, as the Programme works with local festivals such as Glasgow's Aye Write! as well as publishers and other event organisers. 

Assessment

Assessment is via a portfolio of work developed from your workshop work. Normally this will be no more than 25,000 words of prose, 600 lines of poetry, or the equivalent in other genres or forms (as agreed with your tutor). The portfolio represents a space in which you showcase your best work.  It can take a variety of forms and include a range of contents: poetry, drama, fiction, nonfiction, and experimental work.

Craft and Experimentation

Reading as a Writer (CX1)

Weekly seminars (2 hours total) on elements of craft, reading like a writer, and experimentation in your creative practice: the purpose being to develop a shared creative vocabulary and knowledge (in part, for workshop discussions) and to explore precedents and techniques for creating character, point of view, place, time and structure, and to consider related themes to give depth to your own writing and critical skills. 

Assessment is by a portfolio of creative work as per guidelines given at the start of the year.

Experimentation (CX2)

Weekly seminars (2 hours total) continuing the close reading practice of the first semester and exploring experimentation in form. 

Assessment will be by a portfolio of creative work as per guidelines given at the start of the year.

Editing and Publication

Copyright, Publishing and the Culture of Reception 

Weekly seminars that consider the legal, material, mechanical and wider cultural (media) contexts for creative work and the issues that arise from them. Book reviewing, the literary magazine, the role of the agent, the publishing contract, models of publishing, and other collaborative approaches are considered. 

Editing the Twenty-First Century: Editorial Project

This is a supervised creative or research project, either individual or collaborative, in which the student selects an activity particularly relevant to his or her creative work and produces a project in relation to it. The projects are bespoke, undertaken with the agreement of the course convenor, and can consist of: editorial work on From Glasgow to Saturn (our literary Magazine), the creation of a new web magazine or a creative site; the creation of a paper magazine or chap-book; an adaptation from one medium to another (e.g. dramatisation translation); curation of an anthology or exhibition; production or a radio play or short film; outreach activities such as workshops etc.  

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  • Programme overview
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  • '.$card['heading'].'
  • '; } $cardRelatedLinks .= '
  • Related programmes
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    Creative Writing

    Note: This programme is also delivered on campus. To find out more about this programme or the research opportunities available, visit our Creative Writing subject page

    Our celebrated creative writing programme is perfect for talented and aspiring writers looking to gain adventurous and needed creative and critical skills. This is an exciting and supportive online course that offers you the opportunity to develop your writing practice wherever you are in the world.

      ' . $ODLText . ''; } ?>
    • MLitt : 12 months full-time; 24 months part-time
    • Contact: University enquiry team
    • Dr. Carolyn Jess-Cooke: carolyn.jess-cooke@glasgow.ac.uk

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    • Contact:

    Why this programme

    • You will be taught by a number of successful and well-regarded writers and many of our graduates have gone on to be published and acclaimed authors.
    • We have strong links with literary agents and publishers, and an impressive list of published alumni.
    • This programme is delivered online and offers flexible study around your existing commitments.

    Programme structure

    This programme is directed at those who are already engaged in writing. Its clear three-part structure, focused on creative, critical and practical issues, distinguishes this programme from the others offered in the UK.

    Taking the online distance learning MLitt full-time:

    The programme structure covers:

    Semester 1:

    • Creative workshops and guest speakers
    • Reading as a writer (CX1)
    • Copyright, publishing and the culture of reception

    Semester 2:

    • Creative workshops and guest speakers 
    • Experimentation (CX2)
    • Editing the twenty-first century: editorial project

    These courses have been developed to:

    • allow you to experiment with a range of voices, techniques and genres alongside a consideration of major creative and editorial engagements from the modern through the contemporary period.
    • help you develop a critical understanding of diverse creative, theoretic and critical texts.
    • provide a space to undertake extended portfolios of creative and editorial work.
    • familiarise you with the writing context (audience, publishing in all its forms, the legal framework, modes of transmission);
    • And most importantly, to subject you to the discipline of regular writing by providing a stimulating workshop and tutorial environment in which writing skills can be acquired, discussed and honed. 

    Taking the online distance learning MLitt part-time:

    • Part-time year one: students take one semester of workshops and Craft and Experimentation both semesters, and have two tutorials. 
    • Part-time year two: students take one semester of workshops and Editing and Publication both semesters, and have three tutorials.

    Find out more about core and optional courses.

    "The finest creative writing programme in the UK"
    Adrian Searle, Freight Books

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    Core courses

    '; writeProgrammeCourses($coreCoursesCsv, false); if (trim($optionalCoreCoursesCsv)) { echo '

    Plus one from the following

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    Optional courses

    '; writeProgrammeCourses($optionalCoursesCsv, false); } ?>

    Programme alteration or discontinuation
    The University of Glasgow endeavours to run all programmes as advertised. In exceptional circumstances, however, the University may withdraw or alter a programme. For more information, please see: Legal statements: Disclaimer.

    Career prospects

    Graduates have gone into writing, journalism, publishing, and many other professions.

    Positions held by recent graduates include Managing Director, Freelance Writer, Author, Copywriter, Author and Community Arts Work. 

    Find out more about our alumni and their publications by visiting our Creative Writing subject page.

    Entry requirements

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    2013 Entry
    Places are still available for 2013 entry to this programme.

    Our website has been updated to reflect the 2014 entry requirements. In some cases there have been minor changes from the 2013 entry requirements, but please proceed with your 2013 online application and we will advise you if there have been any changes that you need to be aware of.

    You will normally have a 2.1 Honours degree (or equivalent), though this is not a pre-requisite.

    The primary basis for admission is the appraisal of a portfolio of your creative work.

    You submit a portfolio of original work (poetry, fiction, life-writing or other prose, drama, and in some instances a portfolio of work in or of translation). A maximum of 20 pages (one side only, double spaced throughout) per submission will be considered, and the portfolio can contain prose, verse, script, or a combination of these. 

    We also require two letters of reference. Your referees should include an academic and a creative referee where possible. Where this is not possible, you can provide referees from other areas who can vouch that you are who you say you are and that your work and achievements are your own. It is particularly helpful if these referees are familiar with your writing and can provide references on that basis.

    International students with academic qualifications below those required should contact our partner institution, Glasgow International College, who offer a range of pre-Masters courses.

    '; if($GLOBALS['args']['courseid'] != '121') { echo '

    Further information regarding academic entry requirements: student.recruitment@glasgow.ac.uk

    '; } echo '
    '; echo '
    '; */ // HORRIFIC HACK WARNING: These are only three PGTs with no Eng Lang ERs (any more: add a new column in the db) if ($GLOBALS['args']['courseid'] != '429' && $GLOBALS['args']['courseid'] != '613' && $GLOBALS['args']['courseid'] != '121' && $GLOBALS['args']['courseid'] != '620' ) { ?>

    English language requirements

    For applicants whose first language is not English, the University sets a minimum English Language proficiency level.

    International English Language Testing System (IELTS) Academic module (not General Training):

    • overall score 7.0
    • no sub-test less than 7.0
    • or equivalent scores in another recognised qualification:

    Common equivalent English language qualifications

    All stated English tests are acceptable for admission for both home/EU and international students for this programme:

    • ibTOEFL: 100; no sub-test less than:
      • Reading: 24
      • Listening: 24
      • Speaking: 23
      • Writing: 27
    • CAE (Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English): 185; no sub-test less than 185
    • CPE (Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English): 185; no sub-test less than 185
    • PTE Academic (Pearson Test of English, Academic test): 70; no sub-test less than 70
    • Trinity College London Integrated Skills in English: ISEIII at Pass with Pass in all sub-tests

    For international students, the Home Office has confirmed that the University can choose to use these tests to make its own assessment of English language ability for visa applications to degree level programmes. The University is also able to accept an IELTS test (Academic module) from any of the 1000 IELTS test centres from around the world and we do not require a specific UKVI IELTS test for degree level programmes. We therefore still accept any of the English tests listed for admission to this programme.

    Pre-sessional courses

    The University of Glasgow accepts evidence of the required language level from the English for Academic Study Unit Pre-sessional courses. We also consider other BALEAP accredited pre-sessional courses:

    FAQs

    What do I do if...

    my language qualifications are below the requirements?

    The University's English for Academic Study Unit offers a range of Pre-Sessional Courses to bring you up to entry level. The course is accredited by BALEAP, the UK professional association for academic English teaching; see Links.

    my language qualifications are not listed here?

    Please contact the Recruitment and International Office: pgadmissions@glasgow.ac.uk


     

    For further information about English language requirements, please contact the Recruitment and International Office: pgadmissions@glasgow.ac.uk

    Fees and funding

    View fees for entry in 2017-18

    Deposits

    International applicants (from beyond the EU) are requested to pay a deposit of £ when an offer is made.

    Deposits terms & conditions

    The University requires a deposit to be paid by International (beyond the EU) applicants in receipt of an offer to this programmes and who require a Certificate of Acceptance for Studies (CAS) from the University in order that they can apply for a student visa. This is required where the programme is competitive and the deposit is required in order to demonstrate your commitment to attend the programme should you meet all the conditions of your offer.

    If you are made an offer for this programme the University will write to you and request a deposit with information on how to pay your deposit and the deadline for making the deposit payment. Please note that if you are unable to pay a deposit because you are planning to fund your studies through an official financial sponsor then you should upload a copy of your scholarship application or award letter to your application by the deadline date.

    The following guidelines will apply in determining whether or not a deposit will be refunded. Where the deposit is refunded, a 10% handling fee will be deducted.

    Deposits WILL be refunded to applicants under the following circumstances:

    1. Where the University is unable to offer you a place.
    2. Where the applicant has personal circumstances such as illness, bereavement or other family situations that has prevented them coming to the UK. Medical or other proof may be requested.
    3. Applicant can prove that they have applied for a visa to attend the University of Glasgow, but the VISA has been refused. The applicant must have shown ‘real intent' to study at the University of Glasgow but has been unable to obtain their visa.
    4. Applicant does not meet his / her conditions of offer: this may be academic or language test requirements. Satisfactory evidence must be uploaded to the student’s online application to prove that they have not met the conditions of their offer (note that applicants who do not meet the language condition of their offer must show reasonable attempt to meet this, i.e. they must provide a language test which was taken after the date that the deposit was paid).

    Deposits WILL NOT be refunded to applicants under the following circumstances:

    1. Applicant decides to go to another institution.
    2. Applicant cannot be released from work to study at the University of Glasgow.
    3. Applicant does not send completed documentation as requested in the condition of the offer: this may be required in order to prove that the offer has not been met for academic or language test conditions - failure to respond to requests for this information will result in no refund.
    4. Applicant has not secured funding to attend the University of Glasgow: this may be as a result of not being successful in applications for scholarships, OR simply not having sufficient funds in bank at time of visa application. This condition will apply unless it can be proven that there are clear mitigating circumstances which have significantly changed the applicant’s position since the time of application.
    5. Applicant has decided to defer – in this situation the University will retain the deposit and credit it against the applicant’s account for securing their place for the following year of entry. 

    Refund requests must be made within 60 days of the programme start date stated on your offer letter: requests made after this date will be subject to discretion.


    Additional fees

    • Fee for re-assessment of a dissertation (PGT programme): £315
    • Submission of thesis after deadline lapsed: £200
    • Registration/exam only fee: £150
    • General Council fee: £50

    Funding opportunities

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    The scholarships above are specific to this programme. For more funding opportunities search the scholarships database

    '; } else { echo '

    For a list of available scholarships please search the scholarships database

    '; } ?>

    How to apply

    We ask that you apply online for a postgraduate taught degree. Our system allows you to fill out the standard application form online and submit this to the University within 42 days of starting your application.

    You need to read the guide to applying online before starting your application. It will ensure you are ready to proceed, as well as answer many common questions about the process.

    Guide to applying online

    Do I have to apply online for a postgraduate taught degree?

    Yes. To apply for a postgraduate taught degree you must apply online. We are unable to accept your application by any other means than online.

    Do I need to complete and submit the application in a single session?

    No. You have 42 days to submit your application once you begin the process. You may save and return to your application as many times as you wish to update information, complete sections or upload additional documents such as your final transcript or your language test.

    What documents do I need to provide to make an application?

    As well as completing your online application fully, it is essential that you submit the following documents:

    • A copy (or copies) of your official degree certificate(s) (if you have already completed your degree)
    • A copy (or copies) of your official academic transcript(s), showing full details of subjects studied and grades/marks obtained
    • Official English translations of the certificate(s) and transcript(s)
    • Two supporting reference letters on headed paper
    • Evidence of your English Language ability (if your first language is not English)
    • Any additional documents required for this programme (see Entry requirements for this programme)
    • A copy of the photo page of your passport (Non-EU students only)

    If you do not have all of these documents at the time of submitting your application then it is still possible to make an application and provide any further documents at a later date, as long as you include a full current transcript (and an English translation if required) with your application. See the ‘Your References, Transcripts and English Qualification’ sections of our Frequently Asked Questions for more information.

    Do my supporting documents need to be submitted online?

    Yes, where possible, please upload the supporting documents with your application.

    How do I provide my references?

    You must either upload the required references to your online application or ask your referees to send the references to the University as we do not contact referees directly. There is two main ways that you can provide references: you can either upload references on headed paper when you are making an application using the Online Application (or through Applicant Self-Service after you have submitted your application) or you can ask your referee to email the reference directly to pgadmissions@glasgow.ac.uk. See the 'Your References, Transcripts and English Qualifications' section of the Frequently Asked Questions for more information.

    What if I am unable to submit all of my supporting documents online?

    If you cannot upload an electronic copy of a document and need to send it in by post, please attach a cover sheet to it that includes your name, the programme you are applying for, and your application reference number.

    You may send them to:

    Postgraduate Admissions
    Marketing, Recruitment & International Office
    71 Southpark Avenue
    Glasgow
    G12 8QQ

    Can I email my supporting documents?

    No. We cannot accept email submissions of your supporting documents.

    What entry requirements should I have met before applying? Where can I find them?

    You should check that you have met (or are likely to have met prior to the start of the programme) the individual entry requirements for the degree programme you are applying for. This information can be found on the ‘entry requirements’ tab on each individual programme page, such as the one you are viewing now.

    What English Language requirements should I have met before applying? Where can I find them?

    If you are an international student, you should also check that you have met the English Language requirements specific to the programme you are applying for. These can also be found on the ‘entry requirements’ tab for each specific programme.

    Further Information

    Please see the Frequently Asked Questions for more information on applying to a postgraduate taught programme.

    Guidance notes for using the online application

    These notes are intended to help you complete the online application form accurately, they are also available within the help section of the online application form. If you experience any difficulties accessing the online application then you should visit the Application Troubleshooting/FAQs page.

    • Name and Date of birth: must appear exactly as they do on your passport. Please take time to check the spelling and lay-out.
    • Contact Details: Correspondence address. All contact relevant to your application will be sent to this address including the offer letter(s). If your address changes, please contact us as soon as possible.
    • Choice of course: Please select carefully the course you want to study. As your application will be sent to the admissions committee for each course you select it is important to consider at this stage why you are interested in the course and that it is reflected in your application.
    • Proposed date of entry: Please state your preferred start date including the month and the year. Taught masters degrees tend to begin in September. Research degrees may start in any month.
    • Education and Qualifications: Please complete this section as fully as possible indicating any relevant Higher Education qualifications starting with the most recent. Complete the name of the Institution (s) as it appears on the degree certificate or transcript.
    • English Language Proficiency: Please state the date of any English language test taken (or to be taken) and the award date (or expected award date if known).
    • Employment and Experience: Please complete this section as fully as possible with all employments relevant to your course. Additional details may be attached in your personal statement/proposal where appropriate.
    • References: Please provide the names and contact details of two academic references. Where applicable one of these references may be from your current employer. References should be completed on letter headed paper and uploaded on to your application.

    Application deadlines

    For academic year 2017 - 2018:

    • 25 November 2016: Please apply by this date to receive a decision on your application by 16 December 2016  
      (if applying for funding from the University of Glasgow, this deadline must be met)
    • 24 February 2017:  Please apply by this date to receive a decision on your application by 17 March 2017
    • 26 May 2017: Please apply by this date to receive a decision on your application by 16 June 2017

    As we receive a great many applications, prospective students are only allowed to apply once per year.

    Application fee

    A fee of £25 per application must be paid by all applicants to this programme. The application fee will be requested when you apply online and it can be paid using your credit or debit bank card.

    Terms and conditions

    The application fee is non-refundable so it is important that you check any specific entry requirements for the programme. If you are applying with qualifications from outside the UK then you should check the postgraduate taught entry requirements for your country: see International students: In your country

    Applicants who are sponsored may have the application fee waived at the point of applying online. However if the sponsorship status changes before the student registers with the University and the student is self-funding the University reserves the right to invoice the student for the initial application fee.

    Find out more about Application fees


    Please note: applications for SFC funded places are open for entry in September 2016.

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