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Innovation in gas sensing with industry partners

 

Glasgow research is central to an exciting collaboration with industry that is advancing Scotland's influence in the global market for gas sensors. 

There is a growing need for gas sensors. This demand is driven by a variety of new and existing sources, including more stringent government regulations for exhaust emission control and growing concerns towards occupational safety and health.

Through a well-established collaboration with Gas Sensing Solutions (GSS), research at Glasgow has provided a number of breakthroughs in the development of antimonide-based light sources for the mid-infrared spectral range. The mid-infrared (mid-IR) spectral range (3–5 µm) is a focus for gas-sensing applications, as this contains characteristic and unique absorption bands for several gases, including carbon dioxide and methane.

Our research and designs have improved nearly every device manufactured by GSS and resulted in new products for carbon dioxide and methane sensing. These innovations have been transferred to a foundry for large-volume production.

The development of these products has enabled GSS to enter three new markets (healthcare, aerospace and hydrocarbon) and grow their market share by 30%.

This partnership included a highly rated Knowledge Transfer Partnerships programme, industrial case studentships, Innovate and Scottish Enterprise funding and more recently the creation of the Mirage consortium to win £6m funding.‌