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Farmers with their livestock in Africa

Improving human and animal health

 

Glasgow is an international leader in One Health research.

We seek to improve human and animal health by addressing questions that arise as a result of the many and diverse interdependencies between these two domains.

One Health approaches cannot be confined to the study of either human or veterinary medicine, or even to a combination of the two. Instead, the effective resolution of health questions depends critically on understanding the complex biological and social, economic, political and environmental contexts in which those questions are embedded. With the growing recognition of the importance of multimorbidity, this area of research has expanded to include the study of interactions between infectious and non-communicable disease.

These complex issues are most powerfully addressed through interdisciplinary collaborations. At Glasgow, researchers from human and veterinary clinical medicine are closely integrated with life scientists, and interface with social and physical scientists to deliver world-changing research. We work both across the Global South with a focus on sub-Saharan Africa, particularly Tanzania and Malawi, and in Scotland and the rest of the UK.

Our collaborations have made a significant impact on key national, global health and veterinary agendas.

Our people

Dr Katie Hampson discusses mHealth in Tanzania