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Professor Jo Sharp

Professor Jo Sharp

‌Deputy Head of School of Geographical and Earth Sciences

‘One Health research at Glasgow is underpinned by detailed, rigorous and reflective field research, working with diverse groups of researchers and students in the UK, Egypt and Tanzania.’

One of the UK’s leading political geographers, Professor Sharp’s particular research interests in postcolonial and feminist geographies. Her research has traced the ways in which different forms of knowledge are worked through various institutions, whether this is the ways in which geopolitical knowledges of the world are reworked through political accounts, or the ways in which local people’s knowledges of their environment shapes the ways in which development is practiced. Most recently her research has focused on the socio-economic drivers of zoonotic disease transmission in Tanzania, where neglected bacterial zoonotic pathogens, e.g. Leptospira, Coxiella and Brucella, account for 11 times more febrile hospital admissions than malaria.

Jo is committed to collaborative research, and have been involved with interdisciplinary projects with a number of social scientists, natural scientists, and veterinary and human health researchers.

In 2016 Jo was awarded the Busk Medal from The Royal Geographical Society in recognition of her innovation fieldwork and empowerment of others through fieldwork, and in 2017 was made a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.

Find out more about Professor Sharp.

Jo has particular research interests in postcolonial and feminist geographies, and is currently involved in leading interdisciplinary One Health research on endemic zoonoses in the changing landscapes of Northern Tanzania.